Thursday, 10 January 2013

Aromatherapy for the active elderly

Physical aging may be an inevitable process, but aromatherapy can play an important role in maintaining a positive outlook and energy in middle age onwards.  It is best to keep mind and body active with regular exercise, particularly walking, a sensible diet and creative and social pursuits. Without the focus, stresses and daily goals of a career it is necessary to redefine life goalIt is also a chance to try new experiences like aromatherapy.  It is necessary to limit time in front of the television or computor and use senses which have perhaps lain dormant all your life like the sense of smell and touch.

Most people are used to using citrus and spices in their diet and indeed most essential oils are used to lend flavour to food and drink.  For example when we  create a lemon pudding it is the essential oil in the rind we taste. The humble onion is widely hailed and particularly useful as we age.  It is the Essential oil we experience. Aromatherapy involves the use of these essential oils which people find refreshing, stimulating and relaxing.  Particularly at bathtime and in personal care products they find everyday use.  Older age can often invove car of grandchildren.  The addition of a drop of lavender can transform bath time from an anxious affair to a joyous and eagerly anticipated experience before bedtime!

Essential oils are also used by the qualified for professional care and by anyone for self care provided a few sensible precautions to be found on the bottle labels are observed.  Experience of Essential oils can be used to replace harmful habits like smoking and drinking to excess and to promote increased energy and weight loss.  Many people like to volunteer when they retire and those with a knowledge of aromatherapy are always welcome in elder care or care of people with learning disabilities where the Essential oils are used to assist in communication and reduce anxiety.

Anxiety, agitation and depression are often experienced as we age.  Inevitably symptoms can appear and prey on the mind.  In fact NHS Research shows unexplaimed symptoms can be associated with depression in as many as seventy pervent of cases.  Essential oils for emotional effect can be particularly helpful.  A drop of melissa oil on the nightclothes can calm a troubling agitation.

Rosemary and grapefruit, can help sharpen the mind, aid memory and concentration.  Chamomile and lavender provide relief for joints affected by rheumatism and arthritis. Professional massage with black pepper, cypress and juniper stimulates blood and lymph circulation and reduce the risk of varicose veins and oedema. its never to late to begin beauty care of the skin!  Rose oil and geranium promote skin growth, giving a mature complexion a better appearance.

Insomnia, which is frequent among elderly people, can be exhausting and frustrating. Alternatively, you could put a couple of drops of essential oils of chamomile or lavender onto a cotton wool ball and place this in the top pocket of your night clothes or in your pillowcase to achieve a similar effect.

Inhalation of antibacterial essential oils, such as eucalyptus can reduce the risk of illness or help to get rid of an established cold.  To make an aromatic steam inhalation, simply add 3-4 drops of essential oils to a ceramic bowl of hot water. Place a towel over your head and lean over the bowl to inhale the aromas.  Essential oils should be stored in a cool dark place and citrus oil should be kept refrigerated. essential oils are usually diluted with vegetable oils like Almond, Grapeseed, Coconut and Plai oils.

The use of essential oils can also turn into an absorbing hobby in making cosmetics and natural perfumes which make excellent gifts.  The making of such cosmetics and reselling of essential oils can also turn into a profitable and absorbing sideline.  Courses in natural cosmetic making, perfumery and aromatherapy run every three months at the Shirley Price Aromatherapy College which can be found opposite Hinckley Railway Station.

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